Arabic 101: Lesson 2

Ahlan Wa Sahlan- Welcome, Hello

If you ever want to know what it’s like to be an esl student, become one. ≈Me

I’ve never been a very empathetic person but this class is causing a change in me when it comes to my class of first graders.  Even though they understand a lot of English, they are still learning English as a second language and many of them are spoken to in Arabic at home.  I have to repeat directions several times in class and I’ve become more mindful of how fast I speak.  I’ve been told by multiple people that I speak rather fast.

Darryl and I have had 4 Arabic classes now and my confidence level has gone wayyy down.  This class is intense.  I am having a lot of difficulty with reading the letters and remembering what they mean.  However, I am catching on to bits of conversation pieces when the Arabic teachers at my school talk.  I assume it is a lot like this with some of my students.

Anyway this week we learned the Arabic numbers 0-10. Ten is just a combo of 1 and 0.

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Here is my favorite phrase that I’ve learned:  La Atif– it means I don’t know.  I use it quite often.

Other Phrases:

Ayna taskunu- Where you live?

Ana Askonu fi Bin Omran- I live in Bin Omran

Ahamaloo fi- I work in___

Come (not the right spelling but same sound)- how many, Becum- how much

A few Adjectives: Kabir- big; Jadil- new; Jamil- beautiful;

A few nouns: Baab- door; kitaab- book; cowlim- pen, wajib- homework, Bayt- house/home

Possessive- Kitaab- book, kitaaboka- your book for a boy, kitaaboki- your book for a girl, kitaabohu- his book, kitaaboha- her book, kitaabi- my book

Until next time- Iilaa aliiqaa [Ela licka]- See you

 

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A Pledge to My Readers

I promise to not sugar coat what life is REALLY like for an Expat living in Qatar!

My son is sick with the flu and the medical state of this country pissed me off.  My husband carries our medical insurance and pays the premiums.  Every two weeks they directly leave his gross wages before he gets paid, like most working Americans.  The coverage is Federal Blue Cross and you would think it would be the best because of that “F” word, Federal.  Well I don’t understand how an office visit to have my son’s nose and mouth swabbed could cost me a $30 copay, just to be told what I already knew.  Then a prescription for 10 pills cost me a $50 copay.  And if you are like me, you’ve probably asked this insane question, “Then what the F%^& do we pay for every two weeks?”  Don’t get me wrong, I know many Americans and people living in other countries, pay way more for way less, or can’t afford to pay for medical at all, or are in a part of the world where they don’t have access to good medical treatment, but this is AMERICA for God’s sake.  My point in including this in my blog is, I hope that the medical coverage in Qatar is better than it is here in America.  As soon as I find out, I will let you know.  With that being said I have decided to make a pledge to my readers….

A Pledge to My Readers

I promise to always be honest

I promise to not sugar coat what life is REALLY like for an Expat living in Qatar

I promise that despite how anxious I am about moving abroad I will always keep it real

I promise to blog at least once a month

I promise to include the pictures I am allowed

I promise that if I don’t like it there I will admit it

I promise that if I love it there I will admit it

I promise to share the good and the bad

I promise that one of these promises I will probably have to break

I promise not to get over there and forget why I am there

I promise not to get over there and forget who I am

I promise to keep an open mind and remember that Qatar is not America

I promise not to forget that I am a visitor to their country

I promise to try it for at least a year (as long as we are safe)

I promise not to forget that I am an African American Woman

I promise to return home at some point to visit

I promise that I probably forgot something and will add it later